Kurumi Inari – Walnut Inarizushi / Inari Sushi

my aprons purchased on Etsy

Yes, I keep calm and carry on baking 🙂

my baking: Florantan

 

Today, however, I am posing an Inarizushi recipe  – one of my favourite rice dishes.

Inarizushi is seasoned rice wrapped in abura-age (thin deep-fried tofu) pouch simmered in sweet soy sauce. ‘The rice filling can be as it is, or mixed with other ingredients such as sesame, carrots, shiitake mushrooms and others. Although Isarizushi is a type of sushi, you will probably not find it at high-class sushi restaurants. It is normally sold at small local stores or specialized take-out stores. One of the charms of inari-zushi is that it can be easily eaten with one hand.’ (source: MATCHA)

The rice filling normally comes with some ingredients, but this one is very simple – just walnuts!

 

 

 Ingredients

(for 12 inarizushi)

[for dashi stock]
5 cm x 5 cm dashi kombu (dried kelp)
10 g katsuobushi (bonito flakes)
500 ml water

300 g Japanese short grain rice (or 2 rice cooker cups – 1 cup = 180 ml )
340 ml water, ideally soft water
5 cm x 5 cm dashi kombu 

12 square abura-age (or 6 rectangle, cut into half to make 12 )

4 tbsp caster sugar
3 tbsp usukuchi shoyu (Japanese light soy sauce)

60 ml rice vinegar
2  tbsp caster sugar
¼ tsp sea salt

60 g walnut (less bitter ones preferable. I used Howard variety), lightly roasted

optional: mitsuba, boiled (to garnish)

 

 

Method

  1. Soak the dashi kombu in the water for overnight.
  2. Put the rice in a large bowl with some water and wash gently in a circular motion for about 10 seconds, then discard the water. Repeat 3-4 times and drain with a sieve or strainer. Soak the rice in the 340 ml water for 60 min (30 min in summer). Then cook in rice cooker with another dried kelp. If you don’t have a cooker, click here and follow 6 in Method.
  3. Meanwhile, roll the abura-age with a rolling pin to flatten and to make them open easily. Cut one side of each and open carefully to make a pouch (no need for rectangle ones). Put the abura-age in boiling water for a minute and drain well and pat dry.
  4. To make dashi stock, put the kombu and water (Method 1) along with the katsuobushi in a pot and slowly bring just below boiling point. Turn off the heat and remove kombu, but leave katsuobushi for 5 minutes and strain.
  5. In a large pot, pour in the dashi stock, 4 tbsp sugar and soy sauce, and bring to the boil. Put in the abura-age and place a drop lid or cover with foil on top of the liquid and abura-age. Simmer on low heat for about 30 minutes or until the liquid has almost gone (but not all), and gets absorbed into the abura-age. Let them cool in the liquid.
  6. Meanwhile, mix the rice vinegar, 2 tbsp sugar, and salt in a small bowl. Place the cooked rice in a large bowl while hot and slowly pour the mixed vinegar evenly onto the rice by dripping it onto a spatula. Quickly mix using a cut and fold motion. Scatter in the walnuts and fold the rice over from the bottom 3 to 4 times.
  7. Squeeze (but not to much) the abura-age but reserve the liquid. Moisten hands with the liquid and make 12 small cylindrical rice balls so as to fit in the abura-age pouch. Open the pouch and stuff the rice ball in.

    cylindrical rice balls

If you are not sure how to make, watch the below as a reference:

 

For white ones, turn abura-age pouch inside out

 

This post made me hungry – almost midnight though!! 

 

13 thoughts on “Kurumi Inari – Walnut Inarizushi / Inari Sushi

  1. Oishisou~💕 I want to eat this right now!! I have never tried adding walnut into rice. It’s unusual, isn’t it? It’s a great idea having some crunchy texture in soft rice with a little bit of sweet & sourness. Yum!😋

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Glad you liked it. I wish I could deliver to your door!! 🙂
      Actually, kurumi inari is a local speciality in Kasama, Ibaragi, famous for its inari shrine. As you said, the texture and flavour amazed me at the first bite!!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I thought you might have posted an abura-age recipe, but couldn’t recall. Crabmeat, sour cream, mayo etc… in the pocket looks yum!
        Oh, one thing. You might like to add in Yuzu zest instead of walnuts – sometimes I takeaway.

        Liked by 1 person

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