Strawberry Confiture

 

Here in Japan, the strawberry season is coming towards the end ūüė¶

 

 

So I have been cooking strawberries almost every night ūüėÄ
This strawberry confiture tastes sooooo good that I’m going to make¬†it until the last minute!!

 

Ingredients

(makes about 280 – 300 g)

500 g ripe strawberry,  hulled and large ones halved
100 g golden caster sugar
juice of¬†¬Ĺ – 1 lemon (about 2 tbsp)

 

Perfect with vanilla ice cream!

Method

  1. Put the strawberries into a non-reactive pan along with the lemon juice and sugar. Simmer on lower heat , stirring from time to time and skimming off scum.
  2. Roughly mash the berries with a wooden spoon or fork, and leave to simmer until thickened. In all, it will take about 45 Р60 minutes to make.
  3. Cool completely. Keep refrigerated and finish in 1 week. (Alternatively, bottle or freeze)

 

Sunday cream tea ūüôā

 

I shall post a baking recipe with this strawberry confiture.

 

 

 

Lemon Lentil Soup and London

We have reached¬†May already….¬†April has gone without any posts¬†–¬†things have been too hectic here to do blog hopping (sorry guys!) and posts.

This lentil soup is a copycat from Gaby’s Deli, a Jewish restaurant at Leicester Square, London. Not sure if I could succeed in copying it…. Or rather I should say I just tried to imitate their recipe, however, I like mine very much.

Ingredients

2 tbsp olive oil
1 tsp ginger root, freshly grated
¬ľ tsp garlic, minced
1 tbsp fresh coriander stalk, finely chopped
100 g onion, finely chopped
70 g carrot, finely chopped
¬Ĺ tsp turmeric
1 tsp ground cumin
650 and 150 ml water
4 tsp no sodium vegetable bouillon (adjust according to the package instructions)
200 g dried red or yellow lentil, rinsed
1 tsp dried mint leaves
¬Ĺ – ¬ĺ tsp fine sea salt (adjust according to the package instructions)
1 juice of fresh lemon

fresh coriander leaves, to garnish
slices of lemon, to garnish

Method

 ( For 3 -4 servings)

  1. In a large saucepan, put in the olive oil, ginger, garlic and coriander, then fry over low heat stirring consistently until fragrant. Add the onion and sauté for a few minutes but not brown. Spoon in the turmeric and cumin powder, and carry on until fragrant. Add the carrot and fry for further one minute.
  2. Pour the 650 ml water into the pan, stir in the lentil, bouillon, salt  and mint, and increase the heat to bring to the boil. Reduce the heat and cover to simmer for about 20 minutes or until tender.
  3. Purée the soup in a food processor or a blender until completely smooth. Let it sit for overnight if possible.
  4. Return the purée to the pan with 150 ml water and reheat over low heat. Pour in some more water if too thick. When boiled, add the lemon juice and simmer for a few minutes. Taste it and add more salt and/or juice of lemon if needed. Remove from the heat.
  5. Serve the soup in bowls and garnish with a slice of lemon and coriander leaves on top.

When in London, I pretty much enjoy Middle Eastern food. Below are the restaurants and shops I have tried:

Gaby’s Deli
Once it was forced to close, but fortunately still there! It’s no-frills but I enjoy their food and atmosphere. I pop in for a quick meal or when I’m away from home for a while and eager for vegetables.

Lentil soup (source: Yelp)

 

Honey & Co.
Very popular restaurant at Warren St. Booking is a must.

 

Mr Falafel

 

Hummus Bros

 

And I tried my blogger friend Kay’s recommendations last year. Thank you Kay for the posts, Yalla Yalla and the Barbary !

Yalla Yalla

At the corner of¬†Green’s Court, found a nice Italian deli, Lina Stores and took away a cannolo.

I’ll definitely go back for their fresh pasta!

 

The Barbary

Halva ice cream

 

Restaurants and shops on my list:

Ottolenghi
Honey & Smoke  РThank you Kay for sharing the review
Berber & Q – Shawarma Bar
Maroush
Karma Bread Bakery
Pilpel

Let me know if you have any recommendations! Also if you happen to know where I can purchase a bottle of Arak, Israeli anis liqueur.

 

If you¬†badly want tons of Halva…

It’s a Greek restaurant, but try the Greek Larder at King’s Cross when¬†Whole¬†Foods Market’s tiny package cannot satisfy you!¬†They would happily slice some for you ¬†– I bought about¬†500 g¬†ūüėÄ

Bubur Cha Cha

Burbu Cha Cha is a coconut milk based dessert from Malaysia or Singapore. Usually cooked with yam, taro, sweet potatoes, black eyed beans, pandan leaf etc., but I made it simpler with just sweet potato, banana and tapioca.

 

 

Ingredients

(for 2-3 servings)

800-1000 ml water
35 g tapioca pearls

500 ml water
1 tbsp salt

450 ml water
240 g sweet potato, peeled and cut into chunks
110 g coconut cream (thicker and richer than coconut milk)
¬Ĺ¬†tsp coconut sugar
2-2¬Ĺ tsp¬†caster sugar (to adjust)
¬Ĺ banana, cut into small pieces
(optional: fresh mint)

 

 

Method

  1. Pour the 800-1000 ml water in a pan and bring to the boil. Add in the tapioca and simmer over low heat for 1-1.5 hours or until transparent, stirring occasionally. Rinse in running water and drain.
  2. Meanwhile, leave the sweet potato pieces in 500 ml water with salt for about 1 hour and drain. Put the potato chunks in a pan with 450 ml water and bring to the boil. Cook on medium heat until tender.
  3. Reduce to low heat, add the sugars, ladle in the coconut cream and simmer for about a few minutes. Add in the tapioca and banana, then cook for further 2-3 minutes. Taste and add more caster sugar if needed. Serve hot. Or let it cool and chill in fridge to serve cold.

NOTE: Change water before adding coconut cream if use purple sweet potato.

 

Wagashi of the Month: December

Wagashi of the Month for December – Christmas tree and boot

 

 

 

 

Honey Yuzu Marmalade

Tomorrow, the 21st of December this year is Toji, or winter solstice. The two most commonly practiced Japanese customs associated with the beginning of true winter are eating kabocha and having a yuzuyu, a hot bath with yuzu citrus fruit floating in it.

Yuzuyu is a tradition with its roots in prayers for safety and good health. It is said that bathing with yuzu at winter solstice keeps a cold away during winter. And besides, the strong smell of the citrus is believed to remove evil from the body and purify it.

In fact, a component of yuzu is known to be good for skin protection, and to warm the body, and it is also known that the aroma has a stress relief effect. Actually, the fragrance is very pleasant and soothing!

Yuzuyu with my duckies ūüėÄ

What I’m posting here today is not ‘how to make’ or ‘how to have a yuzuyu’¬†but the recipe of pleasantly bitter Honey Yuzu Marmalade.

Ingredients

500 g yuzu, preferably organic
100 g caster sugar
35 g honey (I used orange blossom honey)

Method

  1. Wash the yuzu thoroughly and pat dry with paper towel or something. Cut the citrus in half crosswise, squeeze out juice and strain. Reserve seeds and any removed membrane.
  2. Scoop the pips and pulp into a non-reactive pan and add the seeds and membrane. Pour in enough water to cover and simmer for 10 minuets on medium heat. Strain through a sieve into a bowl, remove the seeds and push to draw out pectin, using a wooden spoon.
  3. Meanwhile, slice the peel into very thin pieces, put into a large bowl of water and wash gently by squeezing. Change the water and repeat the process two more times for a total of three washes.
  4.  Place the peel in a large pot with a plenty of water. Bring to the boil over medium heat and simmer for a few minutes. Then remove from the heat and drain in a strainer. Repeat this process two more times.
  5. Put the peel into a non-reactive pan along with the juice, pectin liquid from the process 3 and 50 g sugar. Simmer on lower heat for 10 minutes, skimming off scum.
  6.  Add in the rest of the sugar and simmer stirring regularly for further 10 minutes or until thick. Spoon in the honey and bring back to simmer, then remove from the heat.
  7. Cool completely. Keep refrigerated¬†and finish in 1-2 weeks. 

Wagashi of the Month: November

As autumn deepens and it gets cooler, leaves change colour into bright red and yellow.

Wagashi of the Month in November is fallen Momiji, or Japanese maple leaves on the bottom of river.

 

Autumn colour from my album:

Day Trip to Hakone – Nov. 2011
Lake Ashinoko, Hakone – Nov. 2011
Tokyo in late autumn, 2014

I’ll add some more photos from a local autumn festival last month.

There are countless local festivals (Matsuri) in Japan because almost every shrine celebrates one of its own. Most festivals are held annually and celebrate the shrine’s deity or a seasonal or historical event. Some festival are held over several days.

An important element of Japanese festivals are processions, in which the local shrine’s Kami (Shinto deity) is carried through the town in Mikoshi (palanquins). It is the only time of the year when the Kami leaves the shrine to be carried around town.

(source: japan-guide.com)

 

Mikoshi

 

Wagashi of the Month: October

Flavours of autumn:

Kaki, persimmon

 

and Kuri, chestnut

 

Things have been hectic lately, but I will come back soon (hopefully)!!

 

 

Wagashi of the Month: September

‘Moon Rabbit’ and ‘Chrysanthemum’ for September

Of all the year’s 12 full moons, the harvest moon in autumn is considered to be the most beautiful¬†here¬†in Japan. There is a moon viewing¬†custom¬†to admire the beauty at the¬†night on 15th August¬†in¬†the lunar calendar, which falls on 15th of September this year. The night is called Jugoya, the night of 15th, and¬†it¬†is¬†said that the moon at¬†Jugoya¬†is the brightest, most beautiful and most sublime of the year although the moon is¬†not always full.

Tsuki Usagi, Moon Rabbit

Why rabbit?

The moon rabbit in folklore is a rabbit that lives on the moon. …¬†The story exists in many cultures, prominently in East Asian folklore and Aztec mythology.¬†In East Asia, it is seen pounding in a mortar and pestle, but the contents of the mortar differ among Chinese, Japanese, and Korean folklore. In Chinese folklore, it is often portrayed as a companion of the Moon goddess Chang’e, constantly pounding the elixir of life for her; but in Japanese and Korean versions, it is pounding the ingredients for rice cake. (source: wikipedia)

On the surface of the moon,¬†Japanese people see¬†not ‘a man in the moon’ but a rabbit pounding Mochi,¬†rice cake.

Mochitsuki – pounding rice cake

Click for more about Tsukimi, moon viewing.

sugar candies: full moon, mountains, Chinese bellflowers, rabbits
full moon and rabbits

 

Another one is Kiku, or chrysanthemum, which symbolises autumn.

Kiku, chrysanthemum

 

Kiku is a symbol of Japan itself as well as Sakura, cherry blossom. I should have put a sword next to the chrysanthemum?

 

Wagashi of the Month: August

 

Towards the end of August… but the very hot weather will continue one more moth. We are still in the midst of summer and seeking¬†for coolness through five senses. The green colour and the fresh smell of bamboo and the leaf evoke a sense of coolness.

 

Kuzu-mochi, a clear jelly of Kuzu (starch from Kuzu or Kudzu Root) wrapped in a bamboo leaf. Kuzu-mochi is also considered a summer dessert.

 

Nadeshiko flower – Dianthus or Pink

 

Yokan, gelled sweet bean paste, in a bamboo tube

 

 

 

Caponata/Fish Caponata and Lipari, Sicily

I love caponata and cook it quite often (as I posted in June). This time, however, I made it a little bit different Рmore Sicilian and summery with vegetable and fish in season. (If you are a vegetarian/vegan or not in the mood for fish, just omit it and add some more vegetables since this recipe is just to combine caponata and fried fish.)

Well ripened and juicy tomatoes at their best are abundant now, so¬†I made¬†Passata di Pomodoro myself to add in. This intense tomato¬†pur√©e is absolutely tasty – natural flavours, especially sweetness, are¬†brought out.¬†You would¬†love to use the passata not only for caponata but also for pasta etc. – I’m going to make¬†Moussaka with this passta and aubergines below.

San Marzano tomatoes to bottle

We are in fresh swordfish months here and it has arrived in stores. In¬†Sicily, swordfish, also in season, is eaten well¬†¬†and there are various dishes:¬†Involtini di Pesce Spada (stuffed swordfish¬†rolls),¬†Pesce Spada al Salmoriglio¬†(grilled swordfish with lemon Salmoriglio sauce),¬†Pasta con Pesce Spada e Melanzane (pasta with swordfish and aubergine) etc… and of course, Caponata di Pesce Spada. Yes,¬†I’m posting a caponata with swordfish recipe today.

Aubergine Season! aubergines suitable for deep frying: White Bell, Black Beauty, Zebra

There various caponata recipes exist in Sicily with local variations:¬†with pine nuts,¬†almonds or pistachio, mint or basil, sugar or honey; with or without garlic, raisins, peppers (capsicums), anchovy are the examples. You might think ‘!!’ or ‘??’ but adding cacao (cocoa powder or grated chocolate) is also one of the varieties. I’m not sure if this is authentic or not. My Sicilian friend in Palermo hasn’t heard of it and says it may be a new recipe while some mention on the web it’s from Syracuse and Catania areas – I though it¬†might be¬†from¬†Modica, a Baroque town famous for its chocolate.

I tried to¬†enhance¬†the flavours to make it summery adding¬†some more vinegar, for example. The first experiment lacked¬†depth. Honey was added instead of sugar, but not enough and still something missing. I was thinking about using balsamic vinegar instead…. After some more experiments, settled on the two recipes: ¬†i) with unsweetened cocoa powder (thick and rich) and ii) with¬†raisins soaked in red wine vinegar (mildly sweet). Seems my caponatas are a melting pot of Sicily!¬† ūüėÄ

Enjoy the summery caponata(s)!

Ingredients

(for 2 – 3 servings; for 4 as antipasto)

for the Passata
1 kg tomato
300 ml/cc water

for the Caponata
500¬†g aubergine (preferably ‘Black Beauty’), cut into 2.5 cm dice
1 tsp salt

200 g swordfish, cut into 2 cm wide pieces
1/2 lemon, squeezed
salt and pepper
1 tbsp olive oil

80 g celery, cut into 1 cm dice
vegetable oil to deep fry (I used sunflower oil)

1tbsp olive oil
120 g onion, sliced
100 g red pepper/capsicum, cut into 2cm thick slices
1 tbsp caper in sea salt, rinsed, soaked for 10 min and drained
50 g pitted olive, halved
200 ml/cc passata
1/2 tsp dried oregano
4 tbsp red wine vinegar (acidity 7%)
1 tsp honey (I used orange blossom honey)
i) 1 tsp (a little less than 1 tsp) unsweetened cocoa powder  or ii) 20 g raisins
salt and pepper (to taste)

20 g almond
fresh basil (to garnish)

salted capers  and dried oregano from Sicily, and homemade passata.

Method

  1. For the passata (Prepare in advance or while salting aubergines), place the tomatoes in a large pot with the¬†water. Cover and simmer over¬†low¬†heat for 30 minutes. Remove from the water and drain for a while, at least 30 minutes,¬†until water doesn’t come out of the tomatoes (Do not press or squeeze!).¬†Strain through a coarse sieve into a bowl, using a¬†wooden spoon to push any larger bits of tomato through. Put¬†the¬†passata in¬†a¬†pan and cook over small heat for 15 minutes or until thickened stirring constantly.
  2. Place the aubergines in a colander, rub with the salt and let it sit for about an hour. Before using, squeeze and pat dry with paper towel.
  3. Rub the fish with the lemon juice and leave for 10 minutes. Pat dry with paper towel, and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Heat 1 tbsp of the olive oil in a frying pan and fry until cooked through and lightly golden. Set aside.
  4. In a pot, bring the vegetable oil to 180¬įC and deep fry the celery until slightly brown. Then boil the oil again to¬†190¬įC and deep fry the aubergines until really brown (but not burnt). Drain the fried vegetables¬†well on paper towel to remove excess oil.
  5. Dissolve the honey in the vinegar Рii) and soak in the raisins for 10 minutes. Set aside. Clean the frying pan, sauté the onion with another 1 tbsp olive oil on medium heat until tender.  Add the red pepper and fry for a few minutes, then olives and capers for a minute.
  6. Spoon in the passata with the dried oregano – i) and cocoa powder. Then pour in the vinegar mixture – ii) including raisins, and mix well for a minutes or until pungent aroma subsides.
  7. Add the deep fried vegetables and the fish, and stir gently to combine. Season with ground pepper, taste it and add salt if necessary. Cool to room temperature, then store in an airtight container in the fridge overnight.
  8. Lightly toast and chop the almonds, and scatter over or mix in the caponata. Garnish with the basil and serve.

If swordfish is unavailable, try fresh tuna, another popular fish in Sicily. Mackerel is one of the options, too. Next time I will cook with polpo, or octpus!!

 

Memoirs of a Foodie 

I always bring lots of foodstuff back from Sicily: sun dried tomatoes, dried oregano, pistachio (nuts, powder, cream, pesto), anchovy… and salted caper is¬†one of them.

In 2014, I sailed to¬†a smaller island,¬†Lipari in the Aeolian Islands¬†off the northeastern coast of Sicily.¬†When¬†I was enjoying the¬†breathtaking¬†scenery at Chiesa Vecchia di Quattropani,¬†a local farmer talked to me and showed me around the field behind the church explaining the crops and plants (I don’t speak Italian but I¬†could¬†understand what he said¬†as I had studied Spanish). He seemed very happy with the arrival of spring and as if¬†he wanted to share the joy with someone. Baby leaves of fig and olive…. It was the first time for me to see caper plants, so I was a bit excited. I think that was why he fetched a jar of homemade capers in sea salt for me! What a surprise and what an encounter!!¬†This is one of the reasons I love travelling on my own.

My rental bike and Salina

And also he plucked a flower and gave me. At home, fully enjoyed caponata, pasta, salad etc. with the capers.

the capers and the flower

 

MUST SEE in LIPARI

Chiesa Vecchia di Quattropani

It was early April and still off season – there were some tourists but very quiet. No one up there, and I had the spectacular view and tranquility all to myself!! (but the farmer disturbed! ūüėÄ )

Chiesa Vecchia
Salina, where il Postino/the Postman (1994) was shot

 

MUST EAT in LIPARI

Popped in Gilberto e Vera twice while in Lipari for just wine (aperitivo) and for a panino. Friendly Girberto chose red wine for me РSalina Rosso from Salina Island. (Tripadvisor reviews)

Oscar is a not to be missed pasticceria/gelateria in Lipari. Their cannolo is just divine and the best one I have ever had. Ricotta cream was stuffed in a homemade shell in front of me!! They offered me some almond biscuits, which were superb and I¬†couldn’t resist buying two packets!

pic from TripAdvisor

 

How to get to Lipari

Milazzo Port –¬†Lipari: about 1 hour by¬†hydrofoil¬†or¬†about 2 hours by ferry (Check with ok ferry)
Access to Milazzo Port: Read tips on TripAdvisor Travel Forum